BATFE Drops 80% Receiver Case in California; Fears Precedent

Arizona -(Ammoland.com)- In 2014, Joseph Roh had a business that dealt in firearms parts. As part of the business, he facilitated the production of lower receivers for AR-15 type firearms, from 80% receivers, in California. In the business, he or his employees would set up the 80% receiver in a Computer Numerical Control (CNC) milling machine. Then, they required the customer to “push the green button”. BATFE believed this made the business one that was manufacturing firearms without a license. Roh was arrested in 2014. From fbi.gov: Through his business, ROHG Industries in La Habra, Roh allegedly started with unfinished lower receivers for AR-15-style firearms. A lower receiver is the frame of a completed firearm that holds the trigger and hammer. An unfinished lower receiver, when machined further, constitutes a firearm. Roh and his employees would finish the lower receivers by machining the devices with a computer-numerically-controlled—or CNC—machine and drill presses that Roh maintained at the La Habra warehouse. Roh attempted to avoid the licensing requirement by requiring that each customer play a token role in the manufacturing process, which often meant merely pushing a...

At 68 years old, Jim Perchard doesn’t stray from learning new things. “You can learn something

At 68 years old, Jim Perchard doesn’t stray from learning new things. “You can learn something every day, if you care to do it,” he said, inspecting a shiny, new precision micrometer. It’s part of a pristine, 23-piece mechanical micrometer set, valued at over $2,200. Just one of the many tools, toys and techie gadgets Area 59 has for its members to use. And a small one at that, especially when compared to any of the many top-notch mills and lathes, CNC milling machines or the 5×8 plasma cutter in the building. There is 1.5 million dollars of cutting-edge technology and state-of-the-art equipment at Jim’s fingertips as he walks us through his most recent designs, 360 blueprints he’s drafted from scratch on a sleek, dual-screen desktop computer smack dab in the middle of the makerspace. After designing, drawing and 3-D printing his first project, a hinge (he never used it, he admitted, “It’s probably in a drawer somewhere at home”), Jim’s moved on to bigger, more complex projects, most of which have  evolved into trinkets and gifts for his girlfriend’s 5-year-old granddaughter, Lauren. As a member, Jim’s access to Area 59 resources, including “the fun guy” Manager Ian Scott and “t...