Leigh Whannell’s The Invisible Man not only dusted off one of Universal’s classic monsters, but updated one of horror’s most overused plot devices. Leigh Whannell’s updated take on The Invisible Man story accomplished a modern revamp of one of Universal’s classic monsters and managed to subvert one of horror’s oldest plot devices in one fell swoop. Though The Invisible Man has seen numerous adaptations over the years in both horror and comedy genres, Whannell’s take shifts the focus from the titular character to the female perspective of his target: Cecilia Kass, his ex-girlfriend who has recently figured out a way to escape Adrian’s abuse, manipulation, and gaslighting. Performed brilliantly by Moss in the role of Cecilia, Whannell’s take on The Invisible Man story is one that hits home for many survivors of domestic and intimate partner abuse. The director and writer took to asking women to share their stories to add authenticity to his script, which is part of the reason why the film has managed to take the box office by storm, paving the way for a new rise of Universal’s Dark Universe. In the wake of COVID-19, The I...